Posts Tagged ‘kiters’

Naish presents the new midseason kites for 2019. Check here the Dash! For advanced kiters who want to take their kiteloops to the next level.
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Here & Now – Ewan Jaspan

Posted: 14th März 2019 by Paula Pintão in Allgemein
Original Post: http://kitemovement.com
Tags: , , , , ,

Watch “Here & Now” with Ewan Jaspan! Check what Australian rider has to say about megaloops, good kiters, the King of The Air and his new film, “Behold & Sea“.

Filmed & edited by Noe Font.
Copyright KNOT FUTURE 2018.

The first heats get underway at Thirteenth Beach.

Read here the report.

Wednesday 12th December
Photos: Ydwer van der Heide
Report: Matt Pearce
Videos: Mintautas Grigas

KSWT Race Director Juan Antonio Aragon was out scouring the coastline early this morning checking out the potential of some nearby beaches after today’s forecasts had suggested better conditions might be found at one of the many kite spots that dot the area around Torquay.

He struck gold at Thirteenth Beach, a popular spot among the local kiters where 20 knot side shore winds and a five foot swell were rolling in so the decision was made to move the comp there right after the morning riders briefing.


Taking cover at Thirteenth Beach / Photo: Ydwer van der Heide

Competitors and crew jumped into the wagons and headed down there and then the women were up first for round one of the single eliminations. It was a gut check for the riders huddled behind the judges tower hiding from the driving rain coming in from the Southern Ocean but the AP flag went up and the first heats of the KSWT Torquay were on!


Frances hits the water in heat one / Photo: Ydwer van der Heide

Australian rider Frances Kelly didn’t quite find her feet against fellow Aussie Anna Williams in the first heat and Anna took the win before heat two brought a surprising result for tour number three Charlotte Carpentier from France who was beaten by another Aussie, Jen Milton, who was riding in footstraps.


Jen Milton on the charge / Photo: Ydwer van der Heide

It’s very rare to see anyone riding straps at a KSWT event and it hasn’t happened at all in the last two years so it was interesting to see them making an appearance today.

Even though they’ve not been a popular choice among tour riders in the past, there’s nothing in the rulebook that bans their use and competitors are entitled to use them if they want to. While straps are allowed, the judges do take their use into account and if a rider is clearly relying on them just to ride a wave then that will be reflected in potentially lower scores.


Charlotte – cheerfulness in the face of adversity / Photo: Ydwer van der Heide

That said, their tactical use paid off for Jen and she was able to hold down a lot more power than Charlotte in the shifting winds and strong side shore rip managing some powerful hacks on the wave during their heat. It was a key example of how choosing your equipment carefully for the day’s conditions can give you an edge in competition.

After heat two, the rain intensified and the wind dropped causing a break in proceedings until the clouds cleared and the wind began to fill in again. Carla Herrera Oria was straight back out on the water warming up and she was getting upwind on steadily on her 12 metre.


Carla rigging up before heat three / Photo: Ydwer van der Heide

However, with a pushing tide and dead onshore winds to contend with the competitors and race crew knew it was going to be a struggle for any of the riders to compete without being pushed back on the beach after every wave. A brief spell of stronger wind pushed through long enough to start heat three but when it backed off again the decision was made to call a halt to proceedings for today.


Close but no cigar on day two / Photo: Ydwer van der Heide

The focus now shifts to tomorrow with a steady looking southeasterly on the forecast and a 2.5 – 3.5 metre swell coming up. The riders will be on the beach at Point Danger at 05:30 am with a first possible start at 06:00 in a bid to make the most of the conditions!

Source: global-kitesports.org

The first heats get underway at Thirteenth Beach.

Read here the report.

Wednesday 12th December
Photos: Ydwer van der Heide
Report: Matt Pearce
Videos: Mintautas Grigas

KSWT Race Director Juan Antonio Aragon was out scouring the coastline early this morning checking out the potential of some nearby beaches after today’s forecasts had suggested better conditions might be found at one of the many kite spots that dot the area around Torquay.

He struck gold at Thirteenth Beach, a popular spot among the local kiters where 20 knot side shore winds and a five foot swell were rolling in so the decision was made to move the comp there right after the morning riders briefing.


Taking cover at Thirteenth Beach / Photo: Ydwer van der Heide

Competitors and crew jumped into the wagons and headed down there and then the women were up first for round one of the single eliminations. It was a gut check for the riders huddled behind the judges tower hiding from the driving rain coming in from the Southern Ocean but the AP flag went up and the first heats of the KSWT Torquay were on!


Frances hits the water in heat one / Photo: Ydwer van der Heide

Australian rider Frances Kelly didn’t quite find her feet against fellow Aussie Anna Williams in the first heat and Anna took the win before heat two brought a surprising result for tour number three Charlotte Carpentier from France who was beaten by another Aussie, Jen Milton, who was riding in footstraps.


Jen Milton on the charge / Photo: Ydwer van der Heide

It’s very rare to see anyone riding straps at a KSWT event and it hasn’t happened at all in the last two years so it was interesting to see them making an appearance today.

Even though they’ve not been a popular choice among tour riders in the past, there’s nothing in the rulebook that bans their use and competitors are entitled to use them if they want to. While straps are allowed, the judges do take their use into account and if a rider is clearly relying on them just to ride a wave then that will be reflected in potentially lower scores.


Charlotte – cheerfulness in the face of adversity / Photo: Ydwer van der Heide

That said, their tactical use paid off for Jen and she was able to hold down a lot more power than Charlotte in the shifting winds and strong side shore rip managing some powerful hacks on the wave during their heat. It was a key example of how choosing your equipment carefully for the day’s conditions can give you an edge in competition.

After heat two, the rain intensified and the wind dropped causing a break in proceedings until the clouds cleared and the wind began to fill in again. Carla Herrera Oria was straight back out on the water warming up and she was getting upwind on steadily on her 12 metre.


Carla rigging up before heat three / Photo: Ydwer van der Heide

However, with a pushing tide and dead onshore winds to contend with the competitors and race crew knew it was going to be a struggle for any of the riders to compete without being pushed back on the beach after every wave. A brief spell of stronger wind pushed through long enough to start heat three but when it backed off again the decision was made to call a halt to proceedings for today.


Close but no cigar on day two / Photo: Ydwer van der Heide

The focus now shifts to tomorrow with a steady looking southeasterly on the forecast and a 2.5 – 3.5 metre swell coming up. The riders will be on the beach at Point Danger at 05:30 am with a first possible start at 06:00 in a bid to make the most of the conditions!

Source: global-kitesports.org

A new kiteboarding video starring Dimitri Maramenides! Watch him training hard with his 15 year old son Cameron.

It’s show time at Ponta Preta, in Cape Verde! Watch local kiters shredding at their playground.

After four hours of kiting in the ninth edition of Red Bull Ragnarok, Florian Gruber of Germany secured the victory with a margin of just two minutes down to last year’s winner and fellow German Felix Kersten. In the difficult wind conditions, only three out of the 350 kiters completed all 105 km within the time limit.

More than 350 kiters from 30 nations all around the world had come to Hardangervidda, Norway to battle through 105 km of kiting on skis and snowboard within a time limit of five hours. Even though this year’s course was almost 30 kilometers shorter than last year’s, the changing and challenging wind made it a hard race on the sunny mountain plateau. After four hours and one minute, Florian Gruber crossed the finish line as the overall winner and winner of the men’s ski category, just two minutes ahead of last year’s winner Felix Kersten. This is Gruber’s second win, he also took home the victory in 2016.


© KYLE MEYR / RED BULL CONTENT POOL

“Amazing, I think this is the hardest time, it’s my third time competing here, and for sure the hardest one. We had at first good wind, smaller kites, and then we had to rig bigger. At one time my kite dropped so the other guys passed me, and it was tough. I always saw like two or three guys in front of me, and to overtake them was the hardest thing ever. I am super happy to win this battle,” Gruber says. The German grew up in the alps, but usually competes on water.

Fourth straight win
Steph Bridge of Great Britain won her fourth straight Red Bull Ragnarok title in the women’s ski category, finishing three laps – the shortest she has ever gotten in her four Ragnarok participations.

”It was just an incredible experience. It always is hard, but this year was more challenging since we had lighter in more areas than before. I have never completed all five laps, that is my ultimate challenge”, Bridge says.

In the snowboard category, Valeria Garashenko of Russia and Peter Martel of Canada took home the victories this year. He was really close to becoming the fourth this year to finish the entire race, but with no wind he had to walk the last few hundred meters and missed the time limit.


© KYLE MEYR / RED BULL CONTENT POOL

“It was hard, as always! I’m dead exhausted, I’m sure everyone else is too. Ragnarok is like no other race, it’s a lot of endurance. You have to sprint for a very long time, you can never go slow, you have to give a hundred percent the whole time, maybe hundred and ten,” Martel says.

Results
Men’s Ski
Florian Gruber (GER)
Felix Kersten (GER)
Jonas Lengwiler (SUI)

Men’s Snowboard
Peter Martel (CAN)
Ronny Bollhalder (SUI)
Nikita Solokov (AUT)

Women’s Ski
Steph Bridge (GBR)
Camilla Ringvold (NOR)
Frøydis Sjøvold (NOR)

Women’s Snowboard
Valeria Garaschenko (RUS)
Marie-Eve Mayland (CAN)
Aija Ambrasa (LAT)

See what Josh Emanuel has to say ahead of finals day.

After a big start to the 2018 Red Bull King of the Air, with Rounds One and Two completed on Saturday 27 January all the elements seem to be lining up for an epic finals day.

Local favourite Joshua Emanuel finished second behind Steven Akkersdijk in their round one encounter and will face fellow Saffa, Oswald Smith and Hawaiian Jesse Richman in the first heat of Round Three when competition resumes.

Josh has been on a tear of late, taking out the Red Bull Megaloop Challenge in Holland and topping the Woo height world record table.

Here’s what he had to say ahead of the event:

“The atmosphere at King of the Air is just something else – when you look back at the beach and you see five to 10 thousand people standing there, it’s pretty amazing. To win it this year you’re going to have to go super high, get your kite super low and just fly on the extreme.”

“The Megaloop Challenge was a huge success for me and has motivated me and pushed me a lot further. It has always been a dream for me to win a competition like that, especially on an international level,” he commented.


Joshua during Round One
© YDWER VAN DER HEIDE / RED BULL CONTENT POOL

Kevin Langeree, together with a 100 other kiters, did a 130km downwinder from Hoek van Holland to Den Helder, in The Netherlands. It was the longest downwinder of his life! Follow Kevin on this exhausting but fun adventure.

Watch and enjoy “Mountains of Wind”, a short documentary by Will Taggart and Pascal Joubert!

As children the Joubert brothers stumbled upon the amazing power of kites. They began to push the limits of snowkiting in its infancy and bringing the sport to the mountains of France. Pascal later brings the European style to the USA and influences a still growing movement. As the sport grows kiters around the world develop styles reflective of their terrain and weather pushing the sport to extreme heights but not without controversy.

Film/Edit
Will Taggart
Pascal Joubert
Aditional Camera
Wayne Phillips
Johann Civel
Charles Symons
Wareck Arnaud
Photo
Bertrand Boone
Cedric Joubert
Pascal Joubert
WIll Taggart
Alaska Snowkite Project
Johann Civel
Wayne Phillips
Charles Symons
Pascal Joubert
Will Taggart
Benjamin Thunell